The Biology of Non-Dystopian Societies: Let’s Look at Africa: Africa or Hybrids?

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Introduction

The room is in what appears to be a large two story house. The doors are made of wood and the doors on the first floor appear locked shut. The door on the second floor is open, and an older black woman stands at its threshold. There are stairs leading up to a landing, where another woman stands wearing only a white robe. She looks down in our direction and motions for us to come in with her hand… the door closes behind us.
The feeling of the space is very womb-like. The room is dark with two large, soft couches in the middle. There are several white candles burning on small tables, a few teddy bears scattered about, and a large painting of black women lying in a field on the wall above one of the couches. The walls are painted red and brown to appear as raw wood; we are standing on red rugs, but there are no visible doors or windows that would indicate an area outside. There is a table covered in various items that look like books, but feel a bit more like paper: journals, folded colorful cloth pages, and pens when I pick them up.

afrofuturist room redresses racial trauma
afrofuturist room redresses racial trauma

The Nature and Role of African Architecture

The African futurist room is a form of architecture, but it goes beyond the scope of that title. This room is referred to as an afrofuturist room. It’s form reflects it’s function, as it allows for black artists to create art that isn’t damaged by racial trauma caused by the outside world. It combats white supremacy not only in art, but also in architecture. African futurist architecture has the power to combat white supremacy, and it can be used in many ways. For example, in the post bellum era it was used to keep black people out of white neighborhoods by building walls that physically separated these communities. In modern times artists like Rashid Richey use this form of architecture to combat racial trauma in present day.
Rashid Richey is one of the most notable afrofuturist artists. He uses this form of architecture as an example to illustrate his theories and ideas regarding black futurism and black pop culture in general. He goes further by using these futuristic vehicles to “digitalize” the past, which shows how he believes that the past isn’t completely erased. In his work, there are two types of utopias; one is fantasy, while the other is whimsical. The whimsical one is represented by his vehicles.
In his work, neologisms are created and used to name the utopias: “Mytho-Futurism” describes this type of utopianism seen in his work. In other words, it’s a utopian form of building made up of physical objects in nature. By using the metaphor of “mytho-futurism,” Rashid Richey expresses his belief that African futurist architecture can be used to combat racial trauma in the present day. The use of this term is important because it helps to demonstrate that his work is not fantasy, but it looks as if it’s rooted in reality due to the fact that there are forms of art that are based on real life events.

afrofuturist room redresses racial trauma
afrofuturist room redresses racial trauma

African Culture and Design Blogging in the 21st Century

Black culture in the 21st century is reshaped every day through social media. The capacity that a person has to express themselves on the internet is endless. Many black artists’ work can be found on African futurist platforms such as Tumblr, Twitter and YouTube, where it is relatable for people of their culture. There are many African futurist blogs and pages on these platforms that can be followed. They have a close relationship with their audience because they are not limited by time or location, this allows for black artists to show their work to people all around the world. There is no longer a need for a physical representative of an artist’s work, you can see the art even if it is not around or the artist is not showing their work physically. Black futurist artists such as Yaa Gyasi and other young black folk have revolutionized the way that African culture will be displayed in the future. There are many creative ways to make money through blogs that display African art. African art blogs have become a source of income for many black artists as well as bloggers.

afrofuturist room redresses racial trauma
afrofuturist room redresses racial trauma

Conclusion: Africa-Style Furniture and Clothing for Any Occasion

African futurist architecture has the ability to be used in many ways, it can be used to show the strength and resilience of black people. There are many different bloggs and pages that display African futurist art. If you wish to purchase any of the products that are displayed on these pages, you can visit their website. African futurist architecture and the African futurist room, is an important form of art that helps combat racial trauma.http://www.afrifuturism.com/
Conclusion: Africa-Style Furniture and Clothing for Any Occasion”
“ARTICLE END”
A.R.T. Magazine, “Afro futurism: An Introduction to Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture” by Trudy Hamilton, Fall 2012 issue. http://www.artsmagazine.com/magazine/mag0911-afrofuturism-bigfoot.html
Black Girl with Glasses, “Academics Decry ‘Afrofuturism’ as an Ideology of Racisim: Afrofuturism Is a Black Feminist, Political Concept” August 29, 2011. https://blackgirlwithglasses.wordpress.com/2011/08/29/academics-decry-afrofuturism-as-an-ideology-of-racism/
Buffalo News, “The New Age of Black Cinema.” April 4, 2011. http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/10021150

afrofuturist room redresses racial trauma
afrofuturist room redresses racial trauma